Publications

Women and Shari’a Law: The Impact of Legal Pluralism in the UK

Elham Manea | I.B.Tauris (UK) |


Women and Shari’a Law: The Impact of Legal Pluralism in the UK is a critique of a paradigm that calls for the introduction of Islamic law in Western legal systems as a means of accommodating Muslim minorities. The book is about:

  • The actual experience of legal pluralism in Britain and ‘non-Western countries’ and their negative consequences;
  • The type of Islamic law being applied by way of this ‘method of conflict resolution’, which contravenes concepts of gender equality and human rights;
  • The social context of closed communities within which this law is being implemented – where both young women and men are subjected to a suffocating social control;
  • And the role played by political Islam in promoting Islamic law in non-Islamic societies.

Building on my knowledge of legal pluralism in Middle Eastern and Islamic countries, I researched the British case, visited Islamic sharia councils and Muslim Arbitration Tribunal in various British cities and met their leading sheiks, including the only woman on those panels. I also interviewed experts, lawyers, activists in civil society and women’s rights groups, especially from within the Muslim communities, in addition to politicians who are pleading for a reform of this ‘model’. The outcome is a book that highlights the negative consequences of introducing ‘special laws’ for ‘specific groups’.

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About Elham Manea

Elham Manea is an Associate Professor of Middle East Studies at Zurich University. Manea is also a writer and human rights activist. She has published academic and non-fiction books in English, German, and Arabic as well as two novels in Arabic. Her latest book is "Women and Shari'a Law – The impact of legal pluralism in the UK". In addition to her position at the University of Zurich, she is a consultant for a number of Swiss government agencies and international human rights organisations. In 2010 the Swiss Federal Council appointed her as a Member of the Federal Commission for Women Affairs - a position she still holds today.

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